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Tom.Delahoyde

Second World War British Brodie Helmet Identification

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Hi all this is my first post.

I found my step-father’s father’s and grand-father’s british brodie helmets from ww1 and ww2. 
I need help identifying some markings on the second world war brodie. 
I am pretty sure the ww2 helmet was worn protecting/ patrolling the British Houses of Parliament after he was injured in standard service.

Here is an image ( sorry for bad quality) 
There are 3 letters painted on the front i think it could be either one of these combinations:
DPH
DPB
OPB
OPH
NPH
NPB

I have looked on a couple brodie specialist websites and can’t find anything.

Sorry for the long post and thanks for any info you can give me, 

Tom

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For starters, a much better picture might help but.......

 

You have a very tired MkII helmet there....standard issue to most of the services (Military and civilian) although in a variety of forms...and if they weren't wearing one of these they were wearing the more unusually shaped CPH or "Zuckerman" helmets. 

This isn't going to sound very helpful but, re the lettering, your guess is as good as mine!....I've been researching these things for 30+ years and I come across a new one (to me) every week...a different marking or different three-letter combination (and they usually ARE three letters)..they could represent his rank/status.....his role/job...the location of his work..the name of his company/employer....the possibilities are numerous. A while ago I started to catalogue them and already have over 1,000 different examples noted...so even if/when you do finalise what you think the letters are without further knowledge of where (job) he wore it it'll be pretty much down to speculation.....but believe me, there's plenty of people out there who'll tell you what it "definitely is".....and I can assure you that it'll almost definitely NOT be whatever they come up with 🙂

If you're confident that you know for sure where he wore it (which role/establishment) your best bet would either be period photos of that place (there's a lot of books about a lot of wartime places)....and/or go searching for roles or locations.....they often crop up in a block of text.....looking for those three letters...but even then you'll be ASSUMING they are a match. You may even find their names in online or Archive records and there MIGHT be some assistance there. There will have been an instruction issued by someone re what to paint on the helmets.......it's England....so there'll probably have been a meeting about it...with minutes...and memos...and ultimately an instruction...and sometimes....just SOMETIMES copies of those are held in Archives, records offices etc...but holding your breath wouldn't be a wise move!

If he was indeed actually "protecting" the HoP, my guess is that he won't be some old chap who worked in a Factory during the day...the HoP was an important building which would've probably been guarded by the Army, Home Guard or Police (none of which are likely to have had three letters on the front)...he might've been a Fire Watcher or Fire Guard...but they usually had "FG".... He might've been on the staff there...and as such had a marking specific to the HoP....although I'd expect a role title to be in there too ie where he worked AND what role he fulfilled.

By all means keep trying to identify what the letters are....and then you'll spend a while making up combinations of letters that it COULD be.....personally, I'd research the PERSON and the place they wore it and keep your eyes peeled for three words.....

Good luck!

 

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This is becoming a very encouraging post.....more and more people having Brit lids...well, two more at least 🙂

Tom....please let us know if/when you crack the code.

...and Ethan, don't be afraid to share your pieces with us (with a pic or two)

 

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Sorry I forgot I posted this here,

this is all I know now:

He was injured in France in 1940 so was ‘dropped’ from active service.

He wore the helmet while on the roofs of Parliament and Whitehall, on watching duties I suppose. We are not sure whether he worked at this position in the government pre-war but certainly after the war, he was head of the South-West ministry of publics works and was held a very high position in surveying land and buildings for military purposes, Goonhilly was his most famous. He was also close firends with Churchill.
On another forum we came to the conclusion that the markings where a D then a crown then H. Meaning Department Head.

Liner markings:
7

 I

VERO

 1938

Which is: Vero 2 = Everett.W.Vero & Co London.........................1937 - 1944

Unfortunately I cannot find a helmet stamp.

Another relative owns his set of uniform buttons, all with ARP on them.

Im, not sure why all this is highlighted,

Many Thanks,

Tom

 

P.S It’s not letting me add any photos as it says they are too big

 

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This is the only other picture it is letting me add as it says the others are too big as I have some better quality photos.

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Without knowing the story, I’d say there are three letters, the last two letters being “F” and “B”.....for Fire Brigade.....but hey, as I’ve said before, we can play this game for ever and a day...good luck and thanks for the pic

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