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Here's an overview of the various types of cuffband worn by the Feldgendarmerie.

The earliest type is the Polizei pattern machine embroidered rayon yarn or hand embroidered aluminium thread on a brown wool band. Manufactured in the same style as the "Motorisierte Gendarmerie" and "Deutsche Wehrmacht" cuffbands worn by the POlice. This type was worn in the transitional period when the early Gendarmen wore a mixture of Police and Army uniforms and insignia, though some of these early Feldgendarmen continued to wear these brown wool cuffbands much later in the war.

This example is hand embroidered in aluminium wire.

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The most typical cuffband worn was the machine woven Rayon type.

The most common type is the one shown at top here, with the loose threads on the reverse typical of "BeVo" style insignia.

Next most common is the version with tightly woven reverse, no loose threads. I have often seen this type declared to be reproduction which is nonsense, though this type has been reproduced but there are clear enough differences for the fakes to to be easily spotted.

The rarest type is the version shown at the bottom. This type is identical in manufacture to a small number of Waffen-SS bands (including "Hitlerjugend")

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Although the obverse of the bands all look pretty much the same ( apart from colours which vary even within examples of the same manufacturing style) there are sufficient minor differences in letter formation and spacing to allow each type to be identified even if sewn on a tunic sleeve.

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The Waffen-SS (and the Luftwaffe) made widespread use of the Army pattern cuffband. Although the Waffen-SS introduced their own pattern, the Army version continued to be used. One former Waffen-SS Feldgendarme who was issued his cuffband in 1944, clearly remembered it as being brown, so definitely the Army, not SS pattern, even though the SS pattern had been introduced some time before.

Presumably this was just a case of insufficient supply of the SS type being available.

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Very infortive thread, thank you for sharing your knowledge on this subject. It's definitely helping to be able to spot the fakes. The rarest type of Feldgendarmerie cufftitle is especially interesting.

Pierre

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Here are some images of the original and fake of the middle type for comparison. You can see that although they have copied the weave style quite well, the letters are not so neatly formed and the "corners" and "edges" on the letters of the fake are more rounded and not so sharp.

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Gordon,

Thank you for your most informative thread about Feldgendarmerie Cuffbands.

Best regards

Eric-Jan

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Can't agree more, EJ.

Gordon, was the Feldgendarmerie Cufftitle noted down in the Soldbuch if a Feldgendarm received one?

P.S.
I used to own a Studioportrait of a SS-Feldgendarm (with the SS-Feldgendarmerie cufftitle in wear)

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Can't agree more, EJ.

Gordon, was the Feldgendarmerie Cufftitle noted down in the Soldbuch if a Feldgendarm received one?

P.S.

I used to own a Studioportrait of a SS-Feldgendarm (with the SS-Feldgendarmerie cufftitle in wear)

Hi Bart,

The answer to your question is yes, it could happen, but it was not normal. I will show some of my Feldgendarmerie Soldbücher with one having an entry for the issue of the cuffband and also the issue of the sleeve eagle. But this is rare.

More common is an entry for the issue of a Ringkragen to a senior NCO. (Normally, only senior NCOs received their own personal Gorget)

I remember the SS-Feldgendarmerie portrait well - I bought it from you ! :D

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There is no shortage of images around of the woven Feldgendarmerie cuffbands being worn, but embroidered examples don't show up so often in wartime photos so here are a few examples.

 

I've lost count of the number of good embroidered bands I've seen condemned as fake because they weren't in the "correct" woven format "like known originals".

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Your posts are always fascinating and superbly informative Gordon, this is another great read :thumbsup:

 

Best wishes

 

Bob

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Gordon,

 

Thank you for your most welcome extra information in post # 13 and 17, I am still learning every day.

 

Best regards

 

Eric-Jan

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GWilliamson:

 

Hello my friend! I just finished reading posts, thank you for starting and uopdating topic. I really like cuffbands from all branches of service.

 

Best regards,

John

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