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Just a brief update on the project.

My French colleagues have been extremely busy with planning the recovery project for the Panzer. By all accounts it seems that it will be a real challenge to win this battle, but win it we will, however long it takes. I will report back with updates.

The next visit to Normandy is in the planning stage. After further research and investigation we have further location possibilities of German vehicles at the Panzegruppe HQ. A further archeological study is required to either confirm or count out these possibilities. I'm planning for a week long trip this time, with at least 3/4 days on location.

PANZER HUNT - ITS OUT THERE

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I am looking for information relating to this Horch Staff Car.

After the last recent field location trip to Normandy, whilst metal detecting the known area of the General's Staff Car, I located 2 of the wheels and the engine identification plate.

I am looking for as much information as possible relating to the production and detail of this vehicle.

In return for any information and possible pictures of this vehicle, I will give the best information provider (decided by me) some artifacts which were found at the location site. These comprise of RAF bomb fragments, various bullet casings, and pieces of equipment that were used by the Germans at this site.

Please message me with any information that you find.

Thanks in advance...

I will update soon with the latest findings in Normandy, for anybody who might be interested.

PANZER HUNT - IT'S OUT THERE

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On a recent Normandy trip, I visited this famous Tiger....

Not quite the 'Panzer Hunt' mentioned in this thread, however a magnificent sight to see.

I just had to climb up and be a 'Panzer Commander', if only for a while...!!!

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Very interesting, I worked for a brief period with the Kampfmittelraumdienst and we always found a lot of of stuff in the actual bomb craters, convienyent holes to fill with junk?  You do have to go much deeper though.

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Very interesting, I worked for a brief period with the Kampfmittelraumdienst and we always found a lot of of stuff in the actual bomb craters, convienyent holes to fill with junk?  You do have to go much deeper though.

Hello Richard

Thank you for taking the time to post.

Indeed bomb craters were used to dump all kinds of material.

Fortunately for us we had heavy machinery to dig out most of our target locations. This saved us a lot of time and effort, and allowed the team to sieve through the soil for any artifacts...

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Here's something that you don't see everyday...

A picture of the interior of the Tiger. The Germans had a problem with this beast of a tank, and so destroyed it by blowing it up from the inside. I have a few other photos which I will post later showing the destructive power of the explosion inside this Tiger, as there is a complete separation along the seam of the outer armour....

Incredible to see...

PANZER HUNT - IT'S OUT THERE...

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Great  photos.  I love  the Tiger  at  Vimoutiers. What  a  great picture of  the destroyed Tiger as  well!!

 

Thanks  for posting

 

Jim

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Great  photos.  I love  the Tiger  at  Vimoutiers. What  a  great picture of  the destroyed Tiger as  well!!

 

Thanks  for posting

 

Jim

Hi Jim

Thanks for taking the time to post.

Yes the Vimoutiers Tiger is a magnificent sight. It is rare to be able to photograph these mighty machines, let alone climb all over it and explore. I have a few more photos of the interior which I will post up.

I managed to make it to Rommel's HQ at La Roche Guyon this time, and have some excellent photos from there.

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Here's a few photos of the interior of the Tiger. One clearly shows the breech to the huge cannon on this monster. In the other, clear separation of the armour can be seen where the explosion ripped through it.

There was a gap between the tracks and body frame. Missing armoured panels allowed me to stick my arm through and photograph and film the interior of this magnificent Tiger.

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Yes, thanks again for posting these images up, I always look forward to seeing your latest posts, and the detail info you give us, well done, and keep up the good work :thumbup:

 

Lou

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Thanks for sharing your photos; amazing how the plating has separated. Great to be able to mount the Tiger tank :w00t:

 

Regards mark

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For  a brief moment  I  thought  it  was  Michael  Wittmann sitting on  the  Vimoutiers Tiger in  the photos :smile:

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The main purpose of the last Normandy visit, apart from spending a few days on the 'Quest for a Panzer' project location, was to explore the route taken by Rommel on 17th July 1944.

This was of course the fateful day when the Field Marshall was strafed by Allied aircraft when returning to his Normandy HQ at La Roche Guyon after a visit to 1st SS Panzerkorps HQ in Urville.

This was an incredible adventure, which I will post more about. I will probably start a new thread for this, as it really was an amazing journey.

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In an attempt to find the location of the Panzerkorps HQ in Urville, we have a feeling that these 2 buildings are strong possibilities.

Further research is needed...

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The Rommel story is one that I have followed for many years...

We followed the Liverot - Vimoutiers road, following the route taken by Rommel on 17th July 1944.

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This is Lang's account of what happened that day. It reads...

About 4pm Marschall Rommel started on the return journey from Dietrich's HQ. He was anxious to get back to Army Group B HQ as quickly as possible because the enemy had broken through on another part of the front. We had to be careful of enemy aircraft, which were flyng over the battlefield continually and were quickly attracted by dust on the roads.

All along the road we could see transport in flames: from time to time the enemy bombers forced us to take to second class roads. About 6pm the Marschall's car was in the neighbourhood of Livarot. Transport which had just been attacked was piled up along the road and strong groups of enemy dive-bombers were still at work close by. That is why we turned off along a sheltered road, to join the main road again two and a half miles from Vimoutiers.

When we reached it we saw above Livarot about eight enemy dive-bombers. We learnt later that they had been interfering with traffic on the road to Livarot for the past two hours. Since we thought that they had not seen us, we continued along the main road from Livarot to Vimoutiers. Suddenly, Feldwebel Holke, our spotter, warned us that two aircraft were flying along the road in our direction. The driver, Daniel, was told to put on speed and turn off on to a little side road to the right, about 300 yards ahead of us, which would give us some shelter.

Before we could reach it, the enemy aircraft, flying at great speed only a few feet above the road, came up to within 500 yards of us and the first one opened fire. Marschall Rommel was looking back at his moment. The left hand side of the car was hit by the first burst. A cannon shell shattered Daniel's left shoulder and left arm. Marschall Rommel was wounded in the face by broken glass and received a blow on the left temple and cheekbone which caused a triple fracture of the skull and made him lose consciousness immediately. Major Neuhaus was struck on the holster of his revolver and the force of the blow broke his pelvis.

As a result of his serious wounds, Daniel, the driver, lost control of the car. It struck the stump of a tree over to the left of the road and then turned over in a ditch on the right. Hauptmann Lang and Feldwebel Holke jumped out of the car and took shelter on the right of the road. Marshcall Rommel, who at the start of the attack had hold of the handle of the door, was thrown out, unconscious, when the car turned over and lay stretched out on the road about twenty yards behind it. A second aricraft flew over and tried to drop bombs on those who were lying on the ground.

Immediately afterwards, Marshall Rommel was carried into shelter by Hauptmann Lang and Feldwebel Holke. He lay on the ground unconscious and covered with blood, which flowed from the many wounds on his face, particularly from his left eye and mouth. It appeared he had been struck on the left temple. Even when we had carried him to safety he did not recover consciousness.

In order to get medical help for the wounded we tried to find a car. It took about three-quarters of an hour to do so. Marschall Rommel had his wounds dressed by a French doctor in a religous hospital. They were very severe and the doctor said there was little hope of saving his life. Later he was taken, still unconscious, with Daniel to an air-force hospital at Bernay, about 25 miles away. The doctors there diagnosed severe injuries to the skull- a fracture at the base, two fractures on the temple and the cheek-bone destroyed, a wound in the left eye, wounds from glass and concussion. Daniel died during the night, in spite of a blood transfusion.

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This picture is about 300yds from the side turning mentioned in Lang's account.

It is about this point that Holke the spotter warned of the attacking aircraft...

Daniel the driver was ordered to speed up. The Horch Staff Car would have been screaming over this hill at a fair rate of knots...

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Approaching the Gatekeepers house on the right hand side of the road, Rommel's Horch would have been hit somewhere in this area, possibly a bit further back up the road.

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