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TinLid

Helmet, Steel, Mk2.

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From Irish to Scots Guards,this one flashed to both sides. This seems to be the case with Scots guards helmets having their red/white/black emblem to both sides.

Both shell & liner are dated 1939.

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A very hard to find Malta stonewall camo, the owners name is written on the inside of the liner.

LT.DEAS.

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@TinLid, excellent camo helmet, beautiful! How was the dessert pattern made? Thanks for sharing. Also since the owner was a LT. I think you are able to track him down or learn more about him? 

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I would say they sanded down the original textured khaki green, applied the brown all over, or whatever colour they had to hand. Then applied the sand coloured paint which has sand added to it, easy to see where the sand in the paint with the brush strokes has pulled the paint away to expose the brown underneath.

Thanks for the nice comment.

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1 hour ago, TinLid said:

I would say they sanded down the original textured khaki green, applied the brown all over, or whatever colour they had to hand. Then applied the sand coloured paint which has sand added to it, easy to see where the sand in the paint with the brush strokes has pulled the paint away to expose the brown underneath.

Thanks for the nice comment.

Thanks, thought something like that. However was this a standard Dessert pattern for that area or more an invention by the soldiers stationed there? 

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Here's some information on one of the WW2 Malta history groups.

The pattern, which was only used in Malta, had two main variations;
Light vehicles, guns, generators, motorcycles, tanks, etc. which had an irregular outline were painted in a pattern resembling the rubble walls which bordered each and every field. This consisted of shapeless blotches of light stone paint, with a darker colour (dark green or dark brown mostly, but sometimes any dark shade available) between the blotches.

Larger vehicles, especially those that had a squarish outline had the stone-coloured paint applied in rectangular blocks to resemble walls of buildings. The darker colour would thus be in straight lines to mimic the mortar and the gaps between the blocks. These vehicles would be parked next to a farmhouse and camouflaged further to resemble an extension of the building.

Malta was awarded the George Cross for not only enduring the heaviest bombing campaign of WW2, but also for taking the fight back to the enemy.

In such a scenario, camouflage was of vital importance for survival. For this reason a camouflage scheme was devised for Malta, and was applied to all equipment destined to be exposed to the enemy. All cars, trucks, motorcycles, field guns, tanks etc. were ‘given the treatment’. Even steel helmets were painted, and not only those used by the services but also those issued to the ARP, the Police, the Public Works, and others.

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Royal Northumberland Fusiliers with the distinctive red bands.

In 1939 there were 9 battalions of Fusiliers, 1,2,7 &9 machine gun, 4 &8 motorcycle, 5 searchlight.

 

 

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